Nutrition facts or nutrition myths

Nutrition facts

Pawel Malczewski
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As a nutritionist, specializing in weight loss, for the past 8 years I have been extensively researching all of the available scientific evidence of what actually makes us overweight and unhealthy.

During this research and my practice, I have discovered some interesting things about the nutrition information that is available in the media and on the Internet. The following is a summary of what I have found:

Nutrition Facts Vs Nutrition Myths

  1. The media and most websites represent personal opinions or experience of both health professionals and laymen, rather than scientifically proven facts;
  2. Information, in most of the cases, has no valuable references to scientific sources to back their claims and if the references exist, they often point to other non-science based websites;
  3. Opinions are often based on the generally accepted, mainstream “nutrition facts”, taken from governmental sources. These so called “nutrition facts” are uncommonly conflicting with the latest scientific evidence.
  4. Often only black or white information is presented. Sometimes there is also evidence supporting the opposite side. The question is: Which side has the most up-to-date evidence? Which side is supported by a stronger evidence?

Most people accessing nutrition and health information now use the commercial sites. This is a concern, since most sites contain distorted nutrition information and advice that is bias and inconsistent with the latest official food and nutrition guidelines or latest scientific evidence. In Canada for example, 45% of the information online contradicts the Canadian Guidelines for Healthy Eating and 80% of those who search nutritional and health information use the unofficial, commercial sites which simply cannot be trusted (1)Ostry A, Young ML,Hughes M. The quality of nutritional information available on popular websites: a content analysis. Health Educ. Res. (2008) 23 (4): 648-655. Available here..

The purpose of this website is to clarify the misconceptions that are currently spreading on the Internet and in the media, to separate known nutrition facts from nutrition myths or at least show which side the evidence supports more.

I will thoroughly investigate each of the most popular nutrition myths, mainstream “nutrition facts” and the real nutrition facts.

All of my research is based on scientific evidence and the references are listed below each article for those who want to investigate further.

References   [ + ]

1. Ostry A, Young ML,Hughes M. The quality of nutritional information available on popular websites: a content analysis. Health Educ. Res. (2008) 23 (4): 648-655. Available here.

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