Selenosis

Selenosis is a disease caused by a chronic oral exposure to high levels of selenium. According to official sources, a high level of selenium is assumed to be over 400mcg per day, although some tests show that 800mcg is still a safe limit. The actual harmful ranges have been noticed at dosages of more than 1,500 mcg. Dosages of more than 3,000 mcg can cause direct DNA damage. The major symptoms are (1)MacFarquhar JK, Broussar DL, Melstorn P, Hutchinson R, Wolkin A, Martin C, et al. Acute Selenium Toxicity Associated With a Dietary Supplement. Arch Intern Med. 2010 Feb 8; 170(3): 256–261. Available here. (2)Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Public Health Statement for Selenium. Available here. (3)Schrauzer GN. Nutritional selenium supplements: product types, quality, and safety. J Am Coll Nutr. 2001 Feb;20(1):1-4. Available here. (4)Reid ME, Stratton MS, Lillico AJ, Fakih M, Natarajan R, Clark LC, Marshall JR. A report of high-dose selenium supplementation: response and toxicities. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2004;18(1):69-74. Available here. (5)Senthilkumaran S, Balamurugan N, Vohra R, Thirumalaikolundusubramanian P. Paradise Nut Paradox: Alopecia Due to Selenosis from a Nutritional Therapy. Int J Trichology. 2012 Oct-Dec; 4(4): 283–284. Available here.:

  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Hair loss
  • Joint pain
  • Brittle and discolored nails (nail loss if the conditions is prolonged)
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Neurological abnormalities (common signs are numb or pins and needles in hands, arms, legs, or feet)
  • Irritability
  • Skin rashes

Regularly eating large quantities of Brazil nuts may lead to selenosis due to very high selenium contents. (read more..)

References   [ + ]

1. MacFarquhar JK, Broussar DL, Melstorn P, Hutchinson R, Wolkin A, Martin C, et al. Acute Selenium Toxicity Associated With a Dietary Supplement. Arch Intern Med. 2010 Feb 8; 170(3): 256–261. Available here.
2. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Public Health Statement for Selenium. Available here.
3. Schrauzer GN. Nutritional selenium supplements: product types, quality, and safety. J Am Coll Nutr. 2001 Feb;20(1):1-4. Available here.
4. Reid ME, Stratton MS, Lillico AJ, Fakih M, Natarajan R, Clark LC, Marshall JR. A report of high-dose selenium supplementation: response and toxicities. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2004;18(1):69-74. Available here.
5. Senthilkumaran S, Balamurugan N, Vohra R, Thirumalaikolundusubramanian P. Paradise Nut Paradox: Alopecia Due to Selenosis from a Nutritional Therapy. Int J Trichology. 2012 Oct-Dec; 4(4): 283–284. Available here.