Nutrition Myths
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Sodium aluminium phosphate

Sodium aluminium phosphate (SAIP) is an inorganic compound which contains sodium salts and aluminium phosphates. Depending on the type, it can be used as an acidity regulator, an emulsifier, a raising agent or a stabilizer.

Acidic SAIP, for instance, is added to baking powders for leavening baked products. When baking, in the presence of heat, SAIP in combination with baking soda produces carbon dioxide, giving the baked products a soft consistency. At room temperature (in mixing stage) only 20%-30% of carbon dioxide is released. SAIP is the primary source of dietary aluminium intake.

Base SAIP is added to processed cheese. (1, 2)

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