Nutrition Myths
Advertisement

Sodium aluminium phosphate

Sodium aluminium phosphate (SAIP) is an inorganic compound which contains sodium salts and aluminium phosphates. Depending on the type, it can be used as an acidity regulator, an emulsifier, a raising agent or a stabilizer.

Acidic SAIP, for instance, is added to baking powders for leavening baked products. When baking, in the presence of heat, SAIP in combination with baking soda produces carbon dioxide, giving the baked products a soft consistency. At room temperature (in mixing stage) only 20%-30% of carbon dioxide is released. SAIP is the primary source of dietary aluminium intake.

Base SAIP is added to processed cheese. (1, 2)

Related Posts

Bovine growth hormone in milk – what are the risks? Milk from cows injected with bovine growth hormone has an increased amounts of IGF-1, pus from the mastitis caused by growth hormone, and may contain antibiotic-resistant bacteria from antibiotics used to treat this mast...
Cooking in high heat increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases Cooking at medium to high temperatures results in the formation of Maillard reaction products. Some of these substances promote inflammation and cardiovascular diseases in people with diabetes.
Does oatmeal have gluten? Oats are gluten-free, unless they were contaminated. However, a small amount of people with celiac disease have an adverse reaction to oats, but the cause is another protein, called avenin.
Can you die from drinking too much water? Drinking above the kidney's ability to filter water (between 800 and 1000 ml per hour) may result in hyponatremia, which can cause swelling of the brain and lead to death.
How to identify trans fats on a food label? Familiarize yourself with the labeling laws in your country and learn how to identify hidden trans fats.
Advertisement
Advertisement

Get updates

Receive regular updates on nutrition myths, facts and curiosities. All based on the latest scientific evidence.